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27th July
2015
written by Richard

To look at it now, solidly in place, you would never know its disturbed history. The broken course of the Sutherland project is one of those fantastic things that could only happen here.  –Shelley Higgins, former City Attorney, in This Fantastic City.

The story of the ill-starred Sutherland Dam, known in its day as  A Dam Fiasco.

Abandoned Sutherland Dam, 1930s.

Abandoned Sutherland Dam, 1930s.

4th May
2015
written by Richard

We arrived at San Diego very tired at ½ past 7. Did not know where to go or what to do. It was dark. A serious time. At length, Walter, Keane, and self were taken in at the Dragoon Quarters and the rest got a tent. Our supper was coffee and crumbs of biscuit.  –H.M.T. Powell, December 3, 1849

The diary of a tired traveler from Illinois provides a rare, colorful account of early San Diego. Of an estimated 80,000 gold-seekers who found their way to California in 1849, relatively few stopped in San Diego. Fewer still left recorded narratives of their time here. The journal of H.M.T. Powell, published in 1931 as The Santa Fe Trail to California, 1849-1852, is considered by historians to be one of the most important accounts of the Gold Rush era.

An eyewitness view of Old Town San Diego in 1849: H.M.T. Powell and San Diego

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5th January
2015
written by Richard

San Diego is now the automobile racing capital of America. For the brief space of one week the Southern California exposition city is to revel in all the glory of the speed game. Next Saturday America’s foremost drivers are to risk their lives . . . in one of the most unique motor races ever staged on the Pacific Coast.  –Los Angeles Times, Jan. 3, 1915

The story of the 1915 Exposition Road Race.

The fastest racers in the world making a turn on the dirt track at Point Loma.

The fastest racers in the world making a turn on the dirt track at Point Loma.

 

18th December
2014
written by Richard

For the first time in the history of aviation, Glenn H. Curtiss yesterday performed the feat of launching his hydro-aeroplane from the water into the air, and after remaining in the air one minute and 21 seconds, alighted upon the water. He repeated his performance at will, skipping about Spanish Bight, off North Island, and circling around the craft in the harbor, with the ease and grace of the ordinary sea-bird.  –San Diego Union, January 27, 1911.

The early months of 1911 would be a remarkable time in the history of aviation, particularly for pioneer flyer Glenn Curtiss. The 33-year-old former motorcycle racer was America’s most accomplished aviator: winner of prestigious speed races, a successful aircraft builder, a respected consultant to the military, and the first aviator to fly and land a plane on water.  The story of The Aviator.

The Curtiss airplane on Spanish Bight at Coronado.

The Curtiss airplane on Spanish Bight at Coronado.

3rd December
2014
written by Richard

San Diego by nature offers the finest spot in the United States for tourists. And tourism is our largest non-government business. [Mission] Valley is part of the Planning Department’s future plan for the tourist, and we are considering throwing it down the drain . . . –Arthur Jessop, downtown merchant, June 26, 1958.

Controversial decisions in city planning are not new in San Diego but perhaps no action has ever been more consequential than a City Council vote in June 1958 to rezone 90 acres of farmland along Interstate 8–a decision that green-lighted construction of the Mission Valley Shopping Center.

Read May Co. Comes to Mission Valley.

Mission Valley Shopping Center opens, February 20, 1961.

Mission Valley Shopping Center opens, February 20, 1961.

 

1st December
2014
written by Richard

Just a reminder, folks.  This Wednesday, December 3, I’ll be at the North Park branch of the Public Library to share some local history stories and photos from San Diego Yesterday. 6:30 p.m. at 3795 31st St.  See you there!

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21st November
2014
written by Richard

The great need of this town is about to be supplied by A. E. Horton, Esq., who will immediately erect, on the northwest corner of Fourth and D Streets, a palatial brick edifice, for hotel purposes. It is to contain a hundred rooms and to be fitted up with elegant furniture and all modern improvements.   –The San Diego Bulletin, December 18, 1869

The story of San Diego’s first hotel, the luxurious Horton House Hotel.

The Horton House Hotel, circa 1870.

The Horton House Hotel, circa 1870.

18th November
2014
written by Richard

Save the date. On December 3, I’ll be at the North Park branch of the Public Library to share some great stories and photos from San Diego Yesterday. That’s 6:30 p.m. at 3795 31st St.
San Diego (619) 533-3972.

Available at Amazon.com.

Available at Amazon.com.

 

26th October
2014
written by Richard

A number of quite prominent San Diegans attended a séance given by Elsie Reynolds in a room at Dr. Barnes’ residence; Friday evening . . . a lady spirit was materialized, and came into the audience to shake hands. A lady present, at an opportune moment, seized the spirit around the waist with one arm and clinched its wrist with the other hand. The spirit shrieked and attempted to tear itself away. . . . The séance ended abruptly.  –San Diego Union, January 20, 1889.

The religion of “Spiritualism” claimed millions of followers in the United States and Europe in the nineteenth century. Believers  included Mary Todd Lincoln who hosted séances in the White House to reach her departed sons Eddie and Willie. Spiritualist demonstrations could also be entertaining, profitable for the mediums, and more often than not, fraudulent, as San Diegans would discover in the summer of 1888: The Spooks in San Diego

A nineteenth century séance.

A nineteenth century séance.

 

22nd October
2014
written by Richard
A postman wearing protective gauze. National Archives.

A postman wearing protective gauze. National Archives.

In the fall of 1918, San Diego children skipped rope to a popular rhyme:

I had a little bird

Its name was Enza

I opened the window

And in-flew-enza

In the last weeks of World War I and in the months that followed, an influenza outbreak swept the world, infecting a billion people and killing as many as 50 million. It was one of the deadliest pandemics in history. In San Diego the scourge reached epidemic proportions . . .

Read the story of The Spanish Flu.

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