Archive for November, 2010

29th November
2010
written by Richard

I take pleasure in advising the people of San Diego, that the Santa Fe Company has today awarded a contract for the new passenger station in your city. . . The work will be commenced at once.                      –A. G. Wells, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, May 23, 1914.

The story of San Diego’s remarkable railroad station, The Santa Fe Depot.

Santa Fe depot, circa 1920.

29th November
2010
written by Richard

The last and largest whale captured this season made an interesting chase. Her blowing was observed by the crews of the four boats almost simultaneously.  The moment she was seen the orders came quick and sharp from the boatswain in command, and at once the men bent to their oars with a will, making their boat bound over the water with such speed as would astonish a green hand. 

–San Diego Union, January 11, 1872

Read the story of The Whales of San Diego Bay.

23rd November
2010
written by Richard

Grossmont . . . It is the chosen spot of many of the gifted in art, literature and science as a place where they may establish a quiet home, with delightful climate, beauty of surroundings and the peace that comes from dwelling in high places.  –Overland Monthly, March 1912

One of San Diego’s most picturesque communities is named for a man poorly remembered today.  William B. Gross, namesake of “Grossmont” came to San Diego in about 1903 after a chance meeting with Ed Fletcher, a young produce salesman with an eye for opportunity . . .

Click here for the story of Grossmont.

16th November
2010
written by Richard
 

USS Constitution, better known as "Old Ironsides"

Rebuilt by the pennies of school children and as sound as on that autumn day more than 135 years ago when she slid down the ways . . . the U.S.S. Constitution, most famous vessel in the American navy, is due alongside Broadway pier this forenoon.  –San Diego Union, January 21, 1933.

In the winter of 1933, thousands of San Diegans flocked to the foot of Broadway to see the most famous Naval ship in U.S. history.    Read about Old Ironsides in San Diego

15th November
2010
written by Richard

San Diego is three years away from a new Central Library.  Getting libraries built in San Diego is a historic problem.  Follow the link below for a six-minute video on the plans for the New Central and a history of difficulties in the past: http://www.kpbs.org/news/2010/nov/12/downtown-library-always-too-popular-too-small/

11th November
2010
written by Richard

Luman H. Gaskill

The personal record books of San Diego pioneers are often a surprising source of contemporary lore.  Business ledgers–sometimes used like personal filing cabinets—recorded everything from commercial activities and receipts, to family history and kitchen recipes.  

Campo pioneer Luman Gaskill kept such a ledger book handy, writing entries for several decades.  Luman would serve as the town storekeeper, banker, marshal, justice of the peace, dentist, and doctor.  His book would become a remarkable compendium of folk remedies and household notes, as well as store receipts and accounts.

Click here for “Dr. Gaskill’s” best recipes for Frontier Medicine.

11th November
2010
written by Richard

Bold adventure, lurking danger, mutiny, death—the story of all this, running like some tale of the days of the Spanish conquests of the New World, was brought to San Diego today by the big tramp steamer Maori King.   

Click here for the story of the Maori King.

The tramp steamer Maori King.

10th November
2010
written by Richard

Personally, I would abolish Halloween, but the city council has taken other steps that we hope will be effective . . .

In World War II, Halloween festivities would be a little different in San Diego.  Read how the city coped with a holiday under wartime conditions: Halloween in Wartime.

3rd November
2010
written by Richard

Scores of Americans found themselves suddenly stranded in Mexico last night when the famous “hole in the fence” at the border was closed yesterday afternoon without warning. . . Protest was made to customs and immigration officials on duty, but the officers said they could do nothing about it . . .

Read about The Hole in the Fence.