Posts Tagged ‘George W. Marston’

17th May
2013
written by Richard

“You can’t parade. Our orders are to prevent it.” In a moment there was a seething, screaming mass around the policemen. Staves and sticks began to fly.
–San Diego Sun, May 31, 1933

Eighty years ago this month, conservative San Diegans got a little riled by The Young Communists.

The riot in Pantoja Park.

The riot in Pantoja Park.

23rd February
2012
written by Richard

“You can’t parade. Our orders are to prevent it.” In a moment there was a seething, screaming mass around the policemen. Staves and sticks began to fly. –San Diego Sun, May 31, 1933

The story of a student demonstration that turned into a riot: The Young Communists.

Courtesy San Diego Police Museum.

3rd February
2012
written by Richard

In December 1919, full-page advertisements began running in San Diego and Los Angeles newspapers soliciting dollars for an audacious plan to explore for oil in San Diego. Remarkably, the instigator of the proposal was the city’s mayor, Louis J. Wilde. The scheme would attract thousands of dollars from hundreds of San Diegans, all anxious to follow their mayor in the “Jazz Cat Gamble.”

Read the story of an reckless scheme by the city’s mayor The Jazz Cat Oil Gamble.

Mayor Louis Wilde and his portable drilling rig. Courtesy Motor Transport Museum, Campo, CA.

23rd September
2011
written by Richard
Douglas Gunn

 

No man was ever more thoroughly identified with the history of a city than is Douglas Gunn with that of San Diego. No city has ever had a more sincere and zealous advocate.  –San Diego Union, January 12, 1888.

The story of Douglas Gunn.

4th April
2011
written by Richard

“Spalding” is perhaps the world’s most recognized name in sporting goods. Less well-known is the man who founded the famous company: Albert Goodwill Spalding, a member of the baseball Hall of Fame, business magnate, and prominent San Diegan.

The story of A. G. Spalding and San Diego.

25th February
2011
written by Richard

As crowds gathered at the offices of one of Southern California’s leading financial institutions, the bank president, J. W. Collins emerged to reassure nervous depositors, explaining: “Owing to continued shrinkage in deposits and our inability to promptly realize on our notes and account, the bank is temporarily closed.” Merely a precaution, Collins soothed, “it is beyond question that depositors will be paid in full.”

Continue reading about the notorious 1891 San Diego Banking Scandal.

29th November
2010
written by Richard

I take pleasure in advising the people of San Diego, that the Santa Fe Company has today awarded a contract for the new passenger station in your city. . . The work will be commenced at once.                      –A. G. Wells, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, May 23, 1914.

The story of San Diego’s remarkable railroad station, The Santa Fe Depot.

Santa Fe depot, circa 1920.

30th April
2010
written by Richard

The philanthropist Andrew Carnegie funded construction of 1,689 libraries in the United States between 1883 and 1929.  San Diego was the site of the first Carnegie library in California.

Read more about the Carnegie Library in San Diego and see the film below.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2QzzcMEhiE