Posts Tagged ‘Murder’

13th October
2011
written by Richard

Between two and four o’clock yesterday morning a woman named Maggie McCutcheon, whose sporting title is “Maggie Bangs,” was killed by pistol shot under circumstances that leave it somewhat of a mystery . . . –San Diego Union, June 19, 1881.

British "Bulldog" revolver

                                                              

The story of death in San Diego’s notorious “Stingaree” district: Maggie Bangs.

8th April
2011
written by Richard

Murray caught; on his way to San Diego. He gave up like a cuss. Terrible excitement. Parties have started out to catch and lynch him. Will keep them back all I can . . . Thomas Weller, deputy constable, July 1889.

A surprise telegram announcing the capture of an “assassin” came as a huge relief to all San Diegans. Only days before the county had been stunned by the slaying of Charles Wilson, the popular City Marshal of Oceanside. Now the “cold-blooded murderer from Texas”–as the newspapers called him–was in the hands of a posse and on his way to a jail cell in downtown San Diego.

The story of Killing the Marshal.

29th December
2010
written by Richard

In a bold headline, the San Diego Union of May 21, 1907, announced a shocking crime: “P.S. SPARKMAN MURDERED AT RINCON.”   The English merchant from the tiny community at the foot of Palomar Mountain was a respected businessman, a well-known friend of the local Indians, and a peaceful man “never known to have a quarrel with anyone.”

Read the complete story of  The English Storekeeper at Rincon.

1st September
2010
written by Richard

Aeronautical genius or scam artist? Charles Toliver excited San Diegans in 1911 with his plans to build a gas-filled dirigible. Investors eagerly bought shares in the Toliver Aerial Navigation Company. But the project did not turn out as expected . . .

Read the complete story of the San Diego Airship.

Charles Toliver.

Charles Toliver.

29th July
2010
written by Richard

The notorious "Russian Mike"

In San Diego’s notorious “Stingaree” district of the 1890s, liquor and violence flowed freely in dozens of saloons south of H Street (Market).  One of the more disreputable dives was the Pacific Squadron Saloon on the corner of 4th and J streets, where a homicide involving alcohol, a cheap gun, and a character named “Russian Mike,” drew rapt attention from San Diegans in the spring of 1899.   Read the story of Russian Mike.